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Jsme tak zvyklí na své věci, že se necítíme doma tam, kde nejsou

publikováno 26.3.2019 od Žijeme minimalismem

Napadla vás někdy otázka, kdy se po nastěhování z vašeho nového bydliště stane domov? Dá se určit okamžik, kdy se to stane? A co potřebujete k tomu, aby bylo pro vás někde “doma”? Za poslední půlrok jsem se už dvakrát stěhovali (více v článcích TADY a TADY). U obou stěhování jsem si všímala tohoto “zvláštního”

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A Pro Declutterer Takes Us Through Her Studio Apartment — And Spills How She Keeps It So Tidy

publikováno 22.3.2019 od New minimalism

All photos by  Ryan Devisser

All photos by Ryan Devisser

THIS ARTICLE FIRST APPEARED ON MINDBODYGREEN, 2/28/19

Kyle Quilici knows a thing or two about maintaining a dreamy home. As the co-founder of New Minimalism, a decluttering and redesign company, and co-author of New Minimalism: Decluttering and Design for Sustainable, Intentional Living, Quilici spends her days helping other people get organized for good. Her own apartment, a tiny San Francisco studio she shares with her boyfriend, is the ultimate test of her skills. Here, Quilici shares her top tips for keeping even the smallest of spaces looking clean and pristine.

What are three words that describe your design philosophy at home?

Simple, functional, and cozy.

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What decluttering tips do you lean on living in a smaller space?

I co-founded a company called New Minimalism, so if it's not already obvious, I care deeply about intentional spaces and mindful consumption! But that's not to say that it comes 100 percent naturally to me. It takes some work to maintain a space like this, mostly in the form of keeping a high standard for what is "allowed" in and regularly removing items if they are no longer useful to me.

If I had to boil it down to just one of the 12 principles found in our book, "A home for everything" is essential and just plain necessary to maintain sanity. It's actually a blessing to have such a small space because it forces us to consider what we have around us.

What criteria does a new item (furniture, accessories, etc.) have to fit to come into your space?

I think it can sneak up on you: the ease with which items come in—the thoughtful gift from your friend, the "perfectly good" (yet insanely hideous) shirt from your company event, etc. It's a regular habit to notice these clutter sneak attacks and not let them linger

Now that we have lived with less, we actually prefer it. So this motivates us to refrain from acquiring in the first place. At this point, anything new that comes in is likely replacing something else. If I'm inspired by something out in the world—let's say a vintage, chunky wool sweater—I'll get rid of a sweater that has been loved and is ready to move on to a new owner.

What habits have helped you share a small space with your partner?

We seem to have similar personal tidy factors (PTF). Our preferred levels of order and cleanliness are aligned, so that is hugely helpful. We also have spaces that are totally one person's domain: his and her sides of the closet, his and her secretary desks, etc.

The entire point of decluttering in the first place is to spend less time managing your stuff.

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How often do you declutter your space? Can you walk us through your cleaning routine?

Keeping clutter at bay requires some regular maintenance, but it shouldn't be overwhelming. The entire point of decluttering in the first place is to spend less time managing your stuff!

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I think what often gets overlooked is that your home first requires a deep, thorough purge to get to the point of maintenance. Rules like "1 in, 1 out" can only work if you've completed a thorough decluttering to begin with. If you find you are spending too much time managing your things and maintaining your home, it's a sign that a more thorough decluttering is in order.

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For cleaning, I like to turn on music or a podcast and open all the windows. After dusting I use a simple water, white vinegar, lemon, and essential oil solution to wipe down surfaces and the floor. We also don't wear shoes in the house, so that seems to help keep the floors cleaner for longer.

What's the oldest thing in your home? Newest?

The oldest is probably the wooden headboard. It used to be a drying tray on an apricot farm. After the apricots were picked, they would be placed on these wooden pallets to dry in the sun. The newest is actually a vintage lamp from an estate sale…so "new" to us.

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What noises can be heard in your home? What smells?

We are lucky to live on a quiet street. During the day we often have the windows open to listen to the birds. We make dinner at home most nights and like to listen to disco music or something fun. Sometimes you'll smell a fire or Palo Santo.

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What's the most sentimental thing hanging on your walls, and what's the story behind it?

We each have one family photo hanging on the wall opposite the bed. His is with his mom and two brothers at the beach. Mine is a black-and-white photo of my mom's mom on her wedding day.

How does your home promote health and wellness?

We don't have a TV, which is nice because it doesn't become the default to watch something at night. Streaming something on the computer still feels like a treat! Cooking at home is a priority for us, and it makes us feel so much better than eating out a lot. Nontoxic, fragrance-free cleaning supplies and beauty products are the norm here. Now that I haven't used toxic, fragrant products, my nose and skin have become really sensitive to them.

What's the best compliment you've ever received on your space?

I like when friends say it doesn't feel a like a studio. We can accommodate 10 friends for drinks and hangs; they all casually lounge about the love seat, on the rug or on the bed. The layout of the apartment is super smart (we credit the architect who designed it!), so the orientation of the rooms helps it feel open and airy, despite the small footprint.

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Střihli jsme si první letošní stěhování

publikováno 26.2.2019 od Žijeme minimalismem

Abychom nevyšli ze cviku, střihli jsme si v půlce února naše první letošní stěhování. Kdo čtete můj blog delší dobu, tak asi víte, že jsme se stěhovali celkem nedávno, v říjnu 2018. Tehdy nám skončil podnájem a my se stěhovali do bytu po dědečkovi. Letos nás čeká jeho velká rekonstrukce, kvůli které se musíme na

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Podnikání podle Marie Kondo

publikováno 19.2.2019 od Magdalena Čevelová

Pokud alespoň trochu sledujete média, už jste na ni nejspíš narazili. Marie Kondo je japonská specialistka na úklid a organizaci. Je autorkou několika knih, z nichž dvě vyšly i v češtině – Zázračný úklid a Žít s radostí. Velkou vlnu zájmu zejména v Americe vzbudila také její reality show na Netflixu. A její rady jsou podle mě velmi dobře [...]

The post Podnikání podle Marie Kondo appeared first on Magdalena Čevelová.

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Fomo vs. Jomo

publikováno 17.2.2019 od Minimalisticky.cz

Novinka z Venezuely, aktuální volební průzkum, doporučení stravovacích expertů, rozhovor s významnou osobností, tragédie na silnici… Denně se na nás valí stovky informací z médií, sociálních sítí a my se je snažíme všechny pojmout, zařadit, udělat si na ně názor, a ještě pozřít další. Jakmile pak nejsme chvíli online a neprojíždíme novinky na Facebooku, nebo neproklikáváme zpravodajská média, […]

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Professional's Workshop with Shira Gill is back!

publikováno 15.2.2019 od New minimalism

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The Professionals’ Workshop with New MinimalismShira Gill is back by popular demand! ⚡️

Join us!

Online, Tuesday, March 19th @7pm PST ✨


WHO IT’S FOR

Professional organizers, coaches, home decorators and stylists, zero-waste educators, minimalists or those aspiring to be any of the above. 

You will learn some of our best practices with clients, and then we'll open it up to an extended Q and A. No topic is off limits - from budgeting to scheduling to generating new clients and programs.

 With a combined experience of over 15 years in the industry, this workshop is guaranteed to add value to your freelance, home-based business.

We are here to serve you! As such, there will be plenty of time allotted to answer your specific questions.  Get them ready!

Sign Up Here

ABOUT THE HOSTS

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Shira Gill is the founder of Shira Gill Home, a lifestyle brand focused on clutter-free living, that merges minimalism, home organizing, and styling. She is the founder of the Virtual Closet Makeover Program and her work has been featured in GoopStyle Me PrettyWho What WearMy Domaine, and Rue Magazine. She is also a contributor to Real Simple Magazine,  Parents Magazine , My DomaineSunset Magazine, and other national publications.  

Kyle Quilici is co-founder of New Minimalism, a home decluttering service based in San Francisco, CA.  She co-wrote, New Minimalism, Decluttering and Design for Sustainable, Intentional Living.  New Minimalism has been featured in The New York TimesOprah.comS.F. ChronicleSunset Magazine, and The Huffington Post. She gets excited about creating beautiful and functional spaces by-way of removing the excess. Environmentally focused, all viable goods from her sessions are donated to organizations in need. 
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LEARN MORE



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3 Common Decluttering Mistakes (And How To Get Over Each)

publikováno 13.2.2019 od New minimalism

This article was originally posted on mindbodygreen.com

image //  via

image // via



As a minimalist and a professional declutterer, I've seen firsthand how changing your space can change your life. I've seen just how powerful the transformation from a cluttered and overwhelming home to one that is simple, beautiful, and streamlined can be.

The process of creating these spaces is actually quite simple: Step one is to go through your stuff. Then, you keep the very best of it—the items that are your favorite, that inspire and delight you, and that are useful to you right now—and donate the rest.

 But just because it's simple doesn't mean it's easy. Our relationship with stuff can be complicated!

According to one new poll by Porch, a digital network of home professionals for hire, over 61 percent of us are ashamed of the extra stuff we hold onto. Let that sink in.

So why do we do it? Why do we hold onto stuff that makes us feel so bad? 

Imagine a baseball cap. An objective observer might note that the cap is worn out, ragged, and ill-fitting. But to the owner, this is the hat they got on their first date with their first love. It's the hat they were wearing when their team finally won. It's the hat they always grab when they go to the beach. Or it's a hat that works perfectly well and doesn't need to be replaced, thank you very much.

All of those reactions to the cap are actually about much larger forces: our relationships, our sense of self, our values. So maybe you know the hat is on the fritz, but it's still hard to let it go.

Porch also detailed three "reasons" or mental blocks that we most frequently use to convince ourselves to hold onto items. Their findings aligned completely with my experience and the archetypes I detailed in the book I co-authored with my business partner, New Minimalism: Decluttering and Design for Sustainable, Intentional Living.

The good news is that these blocks can be fairly easily worked through. With self-awareness and self-kindness, you can release these shame-inducing items and create the home you've always dreamed of.

Here are the three main reasons people give for holding onto clutter, and how to overcome them:

Reason No. 1: "I might need it someday."

Archetype: Practical

Practical people are mind-driven, tend to be logical, strategic and pragmatic; they see potential use in all objects.

The key for the Practical personality is to reframe what exactly makes something useful and to elevate your standards accordingly.

So rather than asking yourself if a third box of paper clips is potentially useful, ask yourself if those items are useful to you right now. Consider not just the costs of perhaps needing to replace something someday but also the costs of keeping items that you don't need. How much space do all of these items take up? How much time do you waste hunting for things you do need or wondering what you have around?

Reason No. 2: "It was expensive."

Archetype: Frugal

Frugal types tend to be very self-aware and clear on their priorities. They are intentional about where they spend their precious resources. They don't like the idea of wasting, whether that be money, time, or energy. This gets tricky when Frugal folks come up against items that aren't useful or wanted but for which they've invested precious resources.

The most important lesson for the Frugal archetype is self-forgiveness.

It can be frustrating to have made a purchasing "mistake." While you can't go back in time and undo that action, you do get to choose how you feel about it moving forward. You can keep items you regret and feel a pang of guilt and shame each time you see them. Or you can acknowledge the sunk cost, internalize the bigger reason this investment didn't pan out, and let the item—and your negative feelings—go and vow to do better next time.

Reason No. 3: "It brings back good memories."

Archetype: Connected

Connected folks are heart-led; they value relationships and shared memories above all else. In general, if objects elicit positive feelings, this is a good thing. But homes oriented toward memories can quickly become museums of the past that don't allow space for new experiences and relationships.

Allow one to stand for many.

Don't feel like you need to part with everything from your beloved grandmother or treasured travels. Instead, select an item or two to represent the relationship or experiences you want to recall. Rather than sticking all of these items in a closet, choose to display and interact with those couple of items and then graciously let go of the rest.

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Mapa knihobudek se slibně plní. Kdo za to může?

publikováno 11.2.2019 od Žijeme minimalismem

ROZHOVOR – Všimli jste si, jak se během posledních měsíců začalo objevovat mnoho dalších knihobudek po celé ČR? To není náhoda. Knihobudky se začaly objevovat proto, že se jejich nimravému mapování nově ujal Jan Bičák z projektu Knihobudka. Jeho zásluhou se mapa stává živou a aktuální. Najednou na jednom místě vidíme, kolik takových miniknihovniček kolem

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Daruji, třídím, vyhazuji

publikováno 8.2.2019 od Minimalisticky.cz

Rozhodli jste se, že začnete minimalizovat a říkáte si, kam se všemi těmi věcmi? Nebo už je máte v krabicích a pytlích a jen přemýšlíte, co s nimi teď rychle udělat? Sepsal jsem pro vás tento článek s možnostmi, jak právě s těmito věcmi, jež jsou určeny k vyřazení z vašeho života, naložit. Zabalit je jen do pytlů a vyhodit […]

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Welcome NYTimes Readers!

publikováno 24.1.2019 od New minimalism

The New Minimalism Book, click to purchase.

The New Minimalism Book, click to purchase.

Wow, oh wow. Cary was interviewed by THE NEW YORK TIMES for an article on digital decluttering.

This was the top of our dream list (besides being interviewed in person by Oprah or meeting any member of the Obama family). It seemed impossible when we began this blog in 2011. It seemed like a million miles away, when our book was just one long Google doc. But here we are! We’re incredibly grateful to Brian Chen for the interview and to all of you who’ve been cheering us on.

If you’re new, welcome!

To learn more about creating a beautiful, simple, streamlined life, read our bookNew Minimalism: Decluttering and Design for Sustainable, Intentional Living.” (Penguin Random-House 2018), or our read more here, on the blog.

To read an excerpt of the New York Times article, continue below.

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With a new year and a new Netflix show that features the Japanese organizing guru Marie Kondo on the art of “Tidying Up,” many of us are experimenting with how to simplify our lives by purging our homes of unwanted possessions.

But what about the stuff we don’t see?

Think about the digital junk we hoard, like the tens of thousands of photos bloating our smartphones or the backlog of files cluttering our computer drives, such as old work presentations, expense receipts and screenshots we have not opened in years.

In addition to the digital mess, tech hardware adds to the pile of junk that sparks no joy in our lives. Everyone has a drawer full of ancient cellphones, tangled-up wires and earphones that are never touched. And the things we do use every day, like charging cables strewn around the house, are an eyesore.

Why are people so terrible about tech hoarding? Cary Fortin, a professional organizer for the company New Minimalism, summed it up: “We don’t really think about the cost of holding on to things, but we think about the cost of needing it one day and not having it.”

Read More on NYTIMES.com

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